As their business continued to grow, GeoBlue relocated from their original space in Radnor, PA to a new build-to-suit building in King of Prussia, PA. Meyer worked with GeoBlue to design a bright, open interior inspired by the wellbeing of its employees. In a new case study, Steelcase delves into the details of creating a space where employees would feel happy, engaged and empowered in their work environment.

 

 

Growing a business is essential to success. But as a company expands, other aspects of the organization may lack for attention. Communication and collaboration decline when silos form in the organization. The company’s culture and brand can suffer, too.

As GeoBlue grew from start-up to a major player in the insurance industry, organizational issues began to emerge. “We had four different offices in three different buildings, and we ended up with little mini-cultures” says Andrew Conn, GeoBlue COO. “We needed to get all four hundred of our employees back together, not only for efficiency, but to make sure everybody got the benefit of the same company culture. Plus, we needed to be able to handle future growth.”

In a company of this scale, people have varied roles. GeoBlue claims processors are focused on heads down work. Other workers spend the day on the phone, taking calls from customers all over the world. Salespeople are mobile, meeting with companies by phone or in person, and making presentations. Meyer Architecture + Interiors understood GeoBlue’s new workplace had to support a wide variety of work and workstyles and to communicate the company’s organizational culture. “We designed the new building to create connection points for people, to make it easy for them to meet, work together and continually feel a part of the larger organization,” says Deb Breslow, principal at Meyer.

Read the full article at steelcase.com!